Spain 1992. Basque Autonomous Community

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019-Spain-Basque-Country-Biscay-Bakio-Saint-Joseph-Celebration-Tradition-Boys-Disguise-Brooms-Anonymous-1992.jpg
Spain. Basque Country. Bakio (Spanish: Baquio) is a municipality in the province of Biscay. A group of boys are disguised during Saint Joseph's Day. They all wear white pants and shirts, conic hats and hold brooms in their hands. Their faces are covered with a white veil. Saint Joseph's Day, also called the Feast of Saint Joseph or the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, is in Western Christianity the principal feast day of Saint Joseph, husband of the Virgin Mary and legal father of Jesus Christ celebrated on 19 March. It has the rank of a solemnity in the Catholic Church. It is also Father's Day in some Catholic countries, mainly Spain, Portugal, and Italy. The Basque Country (Euskadi, País Vasco, Pays Basque), officially the Basque Autonomous Community (Euskal Autonomia Erkidegoa, Comunidad Autónoma Vasca, CAV) is an autonomous community in northern Spain. It includes the Basque provinces of Álava, Biscay, and Gipuzkoa. The Basque Country or Basque Autonomous Community was granted the status of nationality within Spain, attributed by the Spanish Constitution of 1978. The autonomous community is based on the Statute of Autonomy of the Basque Country, a foundational legal document providing the framework for the development of the Basque people on Spanish soil. 19.03.92 © 1992 Didier Ruef